Mnemonic Ntjeru

a long way from home. You will find pretty things, cats, nerd rants, memes, tropes and BAMFs here. [[ Also Known As "Kira Douji" - RPer, writer, gamer, amv enthusiast and complete otaku.]]

 

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Why I'm Serious About Made Up Things - And You Are Too!

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Posts tagged "SOPA"

blackcathacker:

All In One Privacy

Hide My ASS - This websites offers everything from private encrypted chat to private file sharing and is useful for anyone looking for an all in one privacy service without having to go elsewhere.

Social Network -

World Truth - It is extremely rare to be able to find a social network website which is secure but this one is also aimed at exposing the same corrupt elite we all fight. Feel free to add us http://www.worldtruth.org/World_Under_Control/

Chat Software

Cryto Cat - If you want to chat online without being monitored then look no further because this website encrypts all messages sent and you can talk with up to 10 people per chat.

Zfone - Encrypt and secure your online calls with this software which can work with a number of VOIP clients, however it is in the testing stages and a little unnecessary because Skype is still secure (for now anyway).

Browsers

Tor Project - A simple yet effective tool for browsing the web anonymously, by using this tool you will have a broswer which uses a proxy to stop any of your online actions being traced, Simply download the browser and your set.

Search Engines

Protected Search - Another easy to use tool which works with Firefox as a plugin to stop google from monitoring your online movements such as connecting your searches to the sites you visit.

Start Page - A simpler tool than Protected Search because you don’t need to use Firefox or download anything, just simply go to the site and start searching without having your IP address traced.

Email Services

Thunderbird - This Firefox plugin will work along side Engimail email client to make sending and receiving emails a lot safer.

Mail To Web - Possibly the simplest secure email tool which you don’t need to register for and can simply login with you current email address and password.

What to do next

If you know anyone who is concerned about CISPA or their online privacy then please tell them about these and many more tools.

With these applications we could easily surf the web without anyone being able to track anything we do and best of all, it is completely legal.

(via brandx)

feralmango:

If your domain ends in .com, theUnited States governmentsays it has the right to seize it from your control, reportsWired. The same goes for any URL that ends in .net, .cc, .tv, .name, and .org.

This troubling declaration of power comes after US authorities shutdown the online sports gambling siteBodog.comlast week — even though the website was owned by aCanadian company, which many assumed put it outside of US jurisdiction. Not so, apparently. That’s because the only company allowed to issue new .com domains isVeriSign, which is based — you guessed it — in the US.

According to a spokesperson for the department ofImmigration and Customs Enforcement(ICE), anytime the US government wants to take down a .com, .net, .tv, or .name domain, all it has to do is issue a court order to VeriSign, which quickly complies. The same process applies to the Public Interest Registry, which controls the .org top-level domain.

VeriSign, for its part, argues that it is simply obeying the law.

“VeriSign responds to lawful court orders subject to its technical capabilities,” the company said in a statement. “When law enforcement presents us with such lawful orders impacting domain names within our registries, we respond within our technical capabilities.”

The seizure of Bodog is an extension of agovernmentinitiative calledOperation in Our Sites, which launched in June 2010, and has mainly focused on the seizure of US-based domains hocking counterfeit NFL jerseys, and other knockoff goods. As of November of last year, Operation in Our Sites had successfully seized 352 domains. And it obviously doesn’t look like they plan to stop anytime soon.

There a few reasons this brazen flaunting of power is troubling. First, it suggests that the federal government plans to impose its authority on a wider swath of the Web. Second, it shows that while the Internet is a global service, it is still at the mercy of the US government and US law. Online gambling, for instance, isn’t illegal in all countries that have Internet access. And yet Bodog was shut down simply because US citizens could access it.

Finally, the federal government’s apparent determination to assert its authority on the Web should serve as a wake up call to anyone who thinks that the temporary defeat of SOPA and PIPA marked the end of the fight for Internet freedom. It didn’t. It marked the beginning.

http://news.yahoo.com/us-govt-claims-seize-com-domain-004404235.html

I won’t lie, I’m tired.  This fight is ridiculous, something we shouldn’t have to do.  I am so incredibly exhausted by these attempts to break the internet, to break us.  I’ve no more faith in our elected officials to accurately represent us in this capacity.  They don’t know the internet like we do, for better or for worse.  They did not grow up with it, they don’t use it like us, they don’t understand it and they don’t understand us.

I’m done placing my hope in them only to be disappointed.  Time to look into what it takes to get into a public office and brush up on my political skills.  If I can’t trust in them then I would be better served doing the job myself.

c00li0-pastuli0:

First, PIPA and SOPA went down after the online community flexed its muscle. Then the world rallied against ACTA, and now it’s being reviewed by Europe’s highest court. Now our Canadian neighbors need our help, whose citizens are facing an even more immediate threat.

Put yourself in their shoes: What if your government was considering a policy that would force ISPs to provide unrestricted access to your data to law enforcement at any time, for any reason, and without a warrant? What would you do if your country’s leaders were trying to rewire the Internet to support systems of constant digital surveillance? Canadians are facing these dangers in the form of Bill C-30, and Canadian Public Safety Minister Vic Toews (right) is bent on getting it passed despite strong opposition from the public.

When we asked you last week to identify the largest threats facing the internet today, the response was unequivocal: Stop online censorship, invasions of privacy, and digital surveillance (See the P.S.). C-30 is the embodiment of these fears, as it would create a closed and monitored internet. Stand up for the rights of Canadian citizens and call on the Canadian government to abandon C-30:

https://www.accessnow.org/a-license-to-snoop

Democratic governments such as Canada’s should be setting an example of openness and respect for civil liberties for the world — not taking queues from repressive regimes like Syria and Iran. The good news is that support for C-30 is starting to waver, and we can deliver the knock-out punch.

Invasion of privacy. Perpetual online surveillance. You told us that these are your greatest concerns. Now is your chance to stop them:

https://www.accessnow.org/a-license-to-snoop

With determination,
The Access Team

P.S. We asked, and you responded! Almost 15,000 of you from around the world participated in our online poll, and the results were fascinating. Go here to find out what the world is talking about when it comes to digital freedom.

SOURCES:
Toews surprised by content of online surveillance bill
Bill provokes privacy fears
Michael Geist’s FAQ on C-30
Online surveillance bill to get early committee review
Toews’ gaffes aside, Bill C-30 has real dangers

(via c00li0-pastuli0-deactivated2013)

cradled-by-angel-wings:

Welcome to the new Canada: Where your ISP is required to turn over your name, Internet protocol address and other personal information to police, even if they don’t have a warrant.

The Harper government, with the introduction of Bill C-30, wants to give law enforcement unlimited and warrantless access to personal online data. Public Safety Minister Vic Toews has even resorted to using scare tactics to push this bill through, saying that if you’re against C-30 then you are siding with child pornographers!

This hyperbolic fearmongering is a transparent attempt to use children as political shields. The full force of the law should be applied to those who are suspected of crimes against children. However, law enforcement in a democratic society must have a warrant before accessing the information of citizens, including those who are suspected of crimes.

Tell Vic Toews and the Harper government to abandon C-30, respect the rule of law and respect the right to privacy for all Canadian citizens. We’ll deliver it to Prime Minister Harper before this bill proceeds any further.

First, PIPA and SOPA went down after the online community flexed its muscle. Then the world rallied against ACTA, and now it’s being reviewed by Europe’s highest court. Now our Canadian neighbors need our help, whose citizens are facing an even more immediate threat.

Put yourself in their shoes: What if your government was considering a policy that would force ISPs to provide unrestricted access to your data to law enforcement at any time, for any reason, and without a warrant? What would you do if your country’s leaders were trying to rewire the Internet to support systems of constant digital surveillance? Canadians are facing these dangers in the form of Bill C-30, and Canadian Public Safety Minister Vic Toews (right) is bent on getting it passed despite strong opposition from the public.

When we asked you last week to identify the largest threats facing the internet today, the response was unequivocal: Stop online censorship, invasions of privacy, and digital surveillance (See the P.S.). C-30 is the embodiment of these fears, as it would create a closed and monitored internet. Stand up for the rights of Canadian citizens and call on the Canadian government to abandon C-30:

https://www.accessnow.org/a-license-to-snoop

 

Democratic governments such as Canada’s should be setting an example of openness and respect for civil liberties for the world — not taking queues from repressive regimes like Syria and Iran. The good news is that support for C-30 is starting to waver, and we can deliver the knock-out punch.

Invasion of privacy. Perpetual online surveillance. You told us that these are your greatest concerns. Now is your chance to stop them:

https://www.accessnow.org/a-license-to-snoop

 

With determination,
The Access Team

P.S. We asked, and you responded! Almost 15,000 of you from around the world participated in our online poll, and the results were fascinating. Go here to find out what the world is talking about when it comes to digital freedom.

 

SOURCES:
Toews surprised by content of online surveillance bill

 

Bill provokes privacy fears
 

Michael Geist’s FAQ on C-30
 

Online surveillance bill to get early committee review
 

Toews’ gaffes aside, Bill C-30 has real dangers
 

infographr:

Has Hollywood now become what it hated in the past?

Hypocrisy in Hollywood
Created by: Paralegal

mysticpolitics:

‘The SOPA and PIPA bills that went down in flames earlier this year for their unbearable intrusiveness, used content piracy as an excuse to give the government powerful tools with which to censor Internet content. For 2012 the primary author of those bills has switched to a fallback tactic: using child porn as an excuse to create a vast surveillance network from which the government can demand data on every email sent, site visited or link clicked on by all but a fraction of one percent of the U.S. population.’

Read more: PCFIPA: SOPA replacement uses child porn as excuse to spy on 99.7 percent of Americans

think-different-think-freely:

SOPA author back and worse than ever

Tyler Holmar
Another day, another threat to internet freedom. According to  International Business Times, beloved Texas Representative Lamar Smith  is the author of a new bill that includes extreme surveillance provisions, and a name that will  make opponents sound like criminals: H.R. 1981 (bump that last digit up  three times for a more fitting title), or the ‘Protecting Children From  Internet Pornographers Act of 2011.’
The new name has outraged many opponents of SOPA and other bills that  could bring more government control to the internet, like PIPA and ACTA.  It’s hard to imagine the whole world turning out against a bill with  the words ‘protect’ and ‘children’ in the title, regardless of the  actual contents of the bill.
In the words of Business Insider’s David Seaman,  it’s “just a B.S. name so that politicians in the House and Senate are  strong-armed into voting for it, even though it contains utterly insane  1984-style Big Brother surveillance provisions.” Ouch….click on the title to continue reading this enraging story.

Someone, please, take this idiot away and put him away with the rest of the tyrants

 

think-different-think-freely:

SOPA author back and worse than ever

bloodmuffins3:

Here’s some information about ACTA protests to take place around the world. Here’s the email I received about it, which shares some information about the current ACTA situation in regards to the European Parliament: 

What started as a few scattered demonstrations against ACTA has exploded into an international day of action this Saturday! There are nearly 200 events across the world, with hundreds of thousands of people expected to hit the streets to protest this dangerous international agreement.

Our feet have not yet hit the pavement, but our voices are already being heard! Facing a groundswell of opposition to ACTA, the Czech Republic, Poland and Slovenia are already wavering on ratification and the European Parliament’s point person for ACTA resigned his post in protest.

With ACTA’s supporters starting to wake up, we’re facing a critical moment. ACTA can still be stopped in the European Parliament, and if it’s defeated there, the whole agreement will unravel. Momentum is on our side and we must not stop now. Click through to find out how to join hundreds of thousands of people protesting online and offline against ACTA:

https://www.accessnow.org/acta-protest

Here you’ll find information about ACTA, a listing of Saturday’s protests, fact sheets in several languages to hand out, and steps to download the ACTA Protest USTREAM App so you can livestream the event using your mobile phone. If there’s no protest near you, host one by starting a Facebook event and e-mailinfo@accessnow.org the link.

While we support the rights of creators, protection of intellectual property should not come at the expense of freedom of speech and our privacy. It is the duty of government to protect our rights, not put them in the hands of corporations and encourage ISPs to act as judge, jury, and executioner over our content and web activity.

Once seen as a done deal, ACTA’s fate is now hanging in the balance. The world is watching. Stand up for internet freedom this Saturday and protest ACTA!

(via bloodmuffins3-deactivated201208)

knowledgefordummies:

- I guess in life Economist and Businessmen want to make everything fit a certain model so they can rest in peace on their BED MADE OF MONEY

knowledgefordummies:

- I guess in life Economist and Businessmen want to make everything fit a certain model so they can rest in peace on their BED MADE OF MONEY

sexlock:

Not interested in playing the “humble” card, Sherman apparently believes he’s going to get better results in his quest to revive something like the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) by resorting to rank insults. He follows the line of attack carved out by MPAA boss Chris Dodd, wholast month called the anti-SOPA Internet blackout ”an irresponsible response,” “an abuse of power,” “a dangerous and troubling development,” and a “gimmick.”

Sherman, u mad bro? ^______^

mirai-for-you:

Sorry to venture into the political again— I really try to keep this blog a “happy place” in general, but I want to spread the word as much as possible.  I feel like so many of these issues are being kept quiet by the government, and people are not being given the chance to act against them.  Therefore, I want to spread the word.  

Here is a really comprehensive article about five major legislative threats to the internet right now.  

SOPA and PIPA were not the end.  For Americans, there are three major problematic pieces of legislation.  They are:

1) ACTA.  More about ACTA has gotten out as of recent, but it is still a problem.  

2) TPP or TPPA (Trans-Pacific Trade Agreement).  To quote the article above: 

 The foremost problem with TPP is that its details and negotiations are hidden from the public — the very people who will have to live under the rules outlined in the agreement. Second, TPP would force countries to adopt the same troublesome intellectual property laws that exist in the US, including criminal charges for infringers, Internet service provider (ISP) liability, full disconnection for repeat infringers, and penalties for circumventing “digital locks” (i.e. DRM). In many cases, this would require countries to re-write their copyright laws to match — or exceed — the laws of the US, without also including safe guards like fair use. That is to say, it removes individual nations’ abilities to make their own decisions about which copyright laws to adopt by forcing them to legislate above a threshold set by the US.

Additionally, TPP regulates other areas such as pharmaceuticals and could cause the price of medication to US citizens (and others) to skyrocket, a distinct retrograde in terms of affordable health care for everyone.  

3) PCIP or HR 1981 (Protecting Children from Internet Pornographers Act).  Lamar Smith, the chief force behind SOPA, has created yet another problematic piece of legislation wrought with infringements to citizens’ privacy on the internet.  Again from the above article:

 If passed into law, HR 1981 would require ISPs to store which IP addresses they assign to every customer for a minimum of one year. The legislation also allows law enforcement authorities to have access to the IP data of anyone who is charged with any crime whatsoever — not just those charged with crimes related to child pornography. And all the police have to do to access this information is ask for it. No probable cause, no search warrant. Nothing. With a warrant, authorities can also gain access to all information an ISP has on file for an individual customer, including name, address, telephone number, and credit or debit card numbers used to pay for Internet services, as outlined in Section 2703 in title 18 of US Code.

In many ways, this is the most problematic government effort on this list, as it targets all Internet users in a very real, very specific way. The other actions listed above have serious problems, though many of them still wallow in the realm of speculation. HR 1981 is explicit in the ways in which it shreds individual privacy.

All of these pieces of legislation face the really terrifying possibility of becoming law.  This will effect every US internet-user should it come true, so let’s all do our best to stop it.  Contact your congress people. Make online petitions.  Boost the signal.  We need to protect the internet and show the government that they can’t take our freedom of speech and privacy away from us.  

glendaisdope:

White House petition to make more transparent and inclusive  the Trans-Pacific Partnership treaty negotiations.

LEGGO!!!